• South Korea serial killer suspect identified after 33 years

    South Korean police have identified a suspect in one of the country's most notorious serial murder cases more than 30 years after the first of the 10 killings, they said Thursday. Between 1986 and 1991 more than two million police officers -- a record for a single case -- were mobilised to try and find the person who raped and murdered women in rural parts of Hwaseong, south of Seoul.

  • Singapore cracks world’s top 10 most-polluted cities as haze continues

    Singapore joins KL and Jakarta on a no good, very bad list.This article, Singapore cracks world's top 10 most-polluted cities as haze continues, originally appeared on Coconuts, Asia's leading alternative media company. Want more Coconuts? Sign up for our newsletters!

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    Navy Confirms: Those UFO Videos Are Real And Never Should've Been Released

    Naval authorities call the objects in the footage "unidentified aerial phenomena."

  • Jacinda Ardern mistakes Japan for China during Tokyo visit

    New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern said the Japan gaffe was down to jetlag. Photograph: Hagen Hopkins/Getty ImagesNew Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern has blamed jetlag for an embarrassing gaffe on her first official visit to Japan.Ardern had only just touched down in the country and was giving an interview when she said in her opening remarks it was an “incredibly exciting time for New Zealand in its relationship with China - excuse me sorry, with Japan”.When asked later about the blunder, Ardern put the mistake down to jet lag, having only just arrived from New Zealand, reported TVNZ. “You’ll understand I’ve been on continuous travel and just this moment I stopped here,” Ardern said.Japan is three hours behind New Zealand and a direct flight between the two countries takes 11 hours.The timing was unfortunate for Ardern. A report released on Thursday by the Asia New Zealand Foundation questioned whether New Zealand had allowed its relationship with Japan to “drift”, with more attention now being paid to China.“Perhaps we have taken the relationship with Japan a little bit for granted,” said the foundation’s executive director Simon Draper. Japan is New Zealand’s fourth-largest trading partner and worth NZ$8.8bn (£4.45bn) per year.Ardern is in Japan to discuss trade and tourism with the prime minister Shinzo Abe. She will also watch an All Blacks game at the Rugby World Cup.Ardern is on the first leg of an overseas trip that will next take her to the UN leaders general assembly meeting in New York, where she will give the keynote speech at the climate action summit.While in New York, Ardern will hold her first ever formal meeting with Donald Trump and given the pair’s chequered history she will no doubt be keen to avoid any further diplomatic muddles.In November 2017, one month after Ardern took office, Trump allegedly mistook her for the wife of Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau at the east Asia summit in Vietnam.Ardern later apologised for indiscreetly discussing the incident with a friend. The friend - comedian Tom Sainsbury - revealed in a radio interview that Ardern had told her Trump was “not as orange in real life”.

  • Putrajaya says will declare emergency if API breaches 500 due to haze

    KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 19 ― The government reiterated today that an emergency will be declared if pollution caused by the haze forces air pollutant index (API) reading exceeds 500. The Ministry of...

  • 'The NHS has been destroyed': Boris Johnson confronted by father of sick child

    Man accuses PM of visiting Whipps Cross hospital in London for press opportunity. Boris Johnson has been confronted by an angry father at a hospital who told him his baby daughter had nearly died because the ward on which she was treated was “not safe for children” after years of austerity. In an encounter caught on camera, Omar Salem said the care given to his seven-day-old daughter at Whipps Cross university hospital, in north-east London, was “not acceptable”. He told the prime minister: “There are not enough people on this ward, there are not enough doctors, there’s not enough nurses, it’s not well organised enough.” He also accused the Conservative government of wrecking the NHS while using its hospitals as a backdrop for political campaigning. As embarrassed NHS bosses looked on, Johnson claimed “there’s no press here” but he was immediately called out by Salem, who pointed out a camera filming the scene. Labour MPs said Johnson’s denial the hospital visit was a press opportunity showed he was incapable of telling the truth. Salem confronted Johnson on the Acorn children’s ward of the hospital as the prime minister toured with hospital executives. Salem told the PM: “My daughter nearly died yesterday. And I came here, the A&E guys were great but we then came down to this ward here and it took two hours [inaudible] and that is just not acceptable. This ward is not safe for children. “There was one registrar covering the entirety of this ward and the neonatal unit. That is just not acceptable, is it? There are not enough people on this ward, not enough doctors, not enough nurses and it’s not well organised enough.” Salem added: “The NHS has been destroyed … and now you come here for a press opportunity.” Johnson said, incorrectly, “there’s no press here” in remarks recorded by a camera covering the event. Salem then gestured to the cameras, saying: “What do you mean there’s no press here - who are these people?” Johnson said he was at the hospital to “find out” about the state of the NHS. Salem replied: “It’s a bit late, isn’t it? Years and years and years of the NHS being destroyed.” Afterwards, a hospital doctor working on the ward, who was present at Johnson’s visit, backed up Salem’s account, telling the Guardian: “Obviously this was a totally contrived press opportunity - he was shown by far the nicest ward in the hospital. “I am a medical doctor working at the hospital and the lack of resources, levels of underfunding and understaffing are beyond belief.” The doctor said they were “so glad” Salem spoke up. “I wish the prime minister could have seen some of the other wards, which are nothing like what he saw today,” the doctor added. “He should come on a night shift and see how everything doesn’t function at two in the morning.” Salem, who is a Labour activist and came under fire from some on social media after video of the incident emerged, later tweeted: “Boris Johnson had the temerity to come to Whipps Cross hospital for a press opportunity on the children’s ward that my seven-day-old daughter is on, having been admitted to A&E yesterday gravely ill. The A&E team were great but she then went for hours on the ward without seeing a doctor.” He added: “I gave him a piece of my mind about how he is running the NHS based on the experience with my daughter, so that patients get the care they deserve, there is adequate staffing with good working conditions and worried fathers like me can have some peace of mind.” Salem said his role as a Labour activist should not be used to discount his complaints about his daughter’s treatment. The Labour MP for Walthamstow, Stella Creasy, who was in the hospital at the time of the incident, echoed Salem’s concerns. She said the local NHS was in “tatters”, thanks to Johnson’s government. Jonathan Ashworth, the Labour health spokesman, said the encounter showed Johnson “simply can’t be honest with people”. Alan Gurney, the chief executive of Whipps Cross hospital, who stood beside Johnson as he was being confronted, blamed the temporary lack of care for Salem’s daughter on an unexpected emergency. He said: “We are constantly reviewing staffing levels on our wards to ensure our patients are safe at all times, but occasionally - as in fact happened on this ward last night - an unexpected emergency in one part of the hospital can cause a temporary pressure elsewhere.” A spokesman for the prime minister said Johnson was visiting public services to see for himself the reality of the situation. The spokesman said Salem was understandably “very distressed” and the prime minister was “not going to hide away from those circumstances when he goes on these visits, and so obviously is keen to talk to people and empathise and see what he can do to help”. “It’s also a reminder of why exactly he is so keen to make the NHS a priority and make sure it’s getting the funding that it requires,” the spokesman added. Downing Street said the prime minister had spent the past six weeks visiting hospitals “to hear directly from NHS staff and patients - and this is exactly why he is so committed to making sure investment reaches frontline services”. The incident is latest in a series of awkward encounters for Johnson - including being heckled by members of the public - as he tours the UK in anticipation of a likely election.

  • Fight Mayweather or retire, Arum tells Pacquiao

    Veteran boxing promoter Bob Arum believes Manny Pacquiao should retire from the sport soon unless he can land a lucrative rematch with Floyd Mayweather. Arum, who promoted Pacquiao during the Filipino icon's golden years, told the World Boxing News website he wanted to see the 40-year-old hang up his gloves soon. Pacquiao, who won a bruising 12-round battle with Keith Thurman to capture the WBA welterweight crown in July, has not scheduled his next fight.