• Trump says intelligence leaks "deeply troubling"

    U.S. President Trump vowed on Thursday to bring anyone caught leaking U.S. intelligence to justice after British police stopped sharing information about the Manchester suicide bombing with the United States. In a statement released after Trump arrived at the NATO military alliance, the president said he would seek an official review to stop leaks that he said posed a serious security threat. "The alleged leaks coming out of government agencies are deeply troubling," Trump said in the statement.

  • S. Korea rape victim navy officer commits suicide

    A South Korean female naval officer apparently killed herself after being allegedly raped by a senior colleague, a defence ministry spokesman said Thursday. The victim, a lieutenant, was found dead in her single-room apartment on Wednesday, where a message was found reading: "Tomorrow, I won't be in this world any longer." "The lieutenant appeared to have committed suicide," a military spokesman told AFP. Military police have arrested a navy captain as a suspect.

  • Philippines deploys top commandoes, attack helicopters to retake city from Islamist rebels

    By Romeo Ranoco and Roli Ng MARAWI CITY, Philippines (Reuters) - The Philippines deployed attack helicopters and special forces to drive out Islamic State-linked rebels holed up in a besieged southern city on Thursday, as efforts to take back control met heavy resistance. Ground troops hid behind walls and armoured vehicles and exchanged volleys of gunfire with Maute group fighters, firing into elevated positions occupied by militants who have held Marawi City on Mindanao island for two days. Helicopters circled the city, peppering Maute positions with machine gun fire to try to force them from a bridge vital to retaking Marawi, a mainly Muslim city of 200,000 where fighters had torched and seized a school, a jail, a cathedral, and took more than a dozen hostages.

  • Mata praises ruthless Mourinho as finals streak continues

    By Richard Martin STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Juan Mata praised Jose Mourinho's remarkable knack for coming out on top on the biggest occasions after Manchester United beat Ajax Amsterdam 2-0 on Wednesday to signal the Portuguese coach's 12th triumph in a final from 14 attempts. Ajax coach Peter Bosz called the Stockholm showdown "boring" as his young impressionable side were nullified by a far more physical and experienced United side, who won the game with a goal in each half from Paul Pogba and Henrikh Mkhitaryan. Mourinho, meanwhile, made no apologies for his tactics, remarking: "There are lots of poets in football but poets don't win many titles." The win preserved Mourinho's perfect record in major European finals, adding to his 2003 UEFA Cup victory with FC Porto, and his Champions League triumphs with the same club in 2004 and Inter Milan in 2010.

  • Oil prices down sharply ahead of OPEC announcement

    Oil prices were volatile but trading sharply lower Thursday ahead of an expected announcement from the OPEC oil cartel that it will extend recent production cuts for a further nine months. Elsewhere, stock ...

  • China says it warned U.S warship to leave South China Sea

    China said on Thursday that Chinese warships warned a U.S. Navy warship to leave after it sailed within 12 nautical miles of an artificial island built up by China in the South China Sea. Speaking at a monthly news briefing in Beijing, Defence Ministry spokesman Ren Guoqiang said China had lodged stern representations to the U.S over the patrol and that such moves were not conducive to peace and stability in the South China Sea.

  • Manchester bombing latest: Donald Trump vows to prosecute over 'deeply troubling' leaks

    Donald Trump has vowed to "get to the bottom" of US leaks over the Manchester bombing and said the culprit should be "prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law". The US President has been warned by Theresa May that the fact sensitive information about the investigation has repeatedly been handed to American media could undermine the “special relationship” between the two countries. Amid a major transatlantic row over leaks of key evidence in the US, ministers say that shared intelligence being leaked in the US risks compromising the fast-moving inquiry.