• Sharon Chan has no time for another baby

    The actress says between her business, her acting and hosting work, and her son, there is just no time

  • Three missing film students confirmed dead in Mexico

    Three Mexican film students who went missing five weeks ago were kidnapped, tortured, killed and likely dissolved in acid, investigators said Monday, a gruesome end to a case that triggered vehement protests. The case drew outraged protests from their fellow students, backed by Mexican film luminaries such as Oscar-winning directors Guillermo del Toro and Alfonso Cuaron. The most notable example is the disappearance and feared massacre in 2014 of 43 students who were studying to be teachers in the southern state of Guerrero.

  • China family deploy stranger to pose as dead daughter for 13 years to protect mother from grief

    China family deploy stranger to pose as dead daughter for 13 years to protect mother from grief

  • Royal family tree: How the line of succession to the British throne has changed with the new royal baby boy

    Royal family tree: How the line of succession to the British throne has changed with the new royal baby boy

  • Here’s yet another good reason to never use Internet Explorer

    If you or any of your loved ones are still using Internet Explorer -- and yes, I do mean true IE, not Microsoft Edge -- then you probably already realize that you're a good 15 years behind the times. But if you need a good nudge to get you (or your company's IT department) off this addiction before it ruins more good families, this news should do it. A hacking group is actively exploiting a zero-day exploit in Internet Explorer to infect Windows PCs with malware, according to researchers. A team from Qihoo 360's Core security unit "say an advanced persistent threat (APT) group is using the IE vulnerability on a "global scale," according to ZDNet. The vulnerability is being exploited using an infected Office document, loaded with something called a "double-kill" vulnerability. In order for the malware to be triggered, users have to be Internet Explorer and choose to open the infected Office file. From there, the malware uses a well-known exploit to get around Windows' User Account Control, those pop-up windows that are supposed to stop unverified scripts running. The attack does require users to do two things they really shouldn't -- open unverified Office files, and use Internet Explorer -- but the researchers are calling on Microsoft to issue an urgent patch to fix the issue nonetheless. Short of burning Internet Explorer to the ground (a rational choice, but one that users on institution IT systems don't always have the option of), there's nothing users can do to protect themselves right now.

  • Entrance to the former New World Amusement Park put on sale at $13.5m

    A freehold commercial site along Jalan Besar Road with a long and rich history has been put up for sale via an expression of interest (EOI) at a guide price of $13.5 million...

  • These Are the Best Places to Retire in 2018

    Baby boomers, take note. From ELLE Decor