• Singapore probes match-fixing at SEA Games

    By Julian Linden SINGAPORE (Reuters) - At the same time as football's world leaders were meeting in Switzerland vowing to clean up the game following the latest corruption cases, another scandal emerged, this time involving match-fixing in Asia. Singaporean authorities announced on Friday, at the exact same time that the FIFA Congress was taking place in Zurich, that they had arrested an alleged match-fixer as well as several co-conspirators following an investigation into upcoming football matches at the Southeast Asian Games. Singapore's Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) did not identify any of the people who were arrested but said members of at least one visiting international team were helping officials in relation to the probe.

    Reuters
  • Sim Lim Square saga: Jover Chew out on bail over cheating cases

    Jover Chew, the owner of the now-defunct Mobile Air, and four other men were charged in court on Friday, 29 May, over a slew of cheating cases that allegedly occurred at the shop at Sim Lim Square Mall. Chew faces 26 charges, of which 25 are for cheating and one criminal intimidation charge. In a Straits Times report, the police said in a statement that the five men were arrested on 27 May for “a series of cheating cases”.

    Yahoo Newsroom
  • After Over Two Months Of Drama, Amos Yee’s LKY Video Is Back Again

    The LKY video that started the whole Amos Yee saga has returned. Yesterday, a Channel NewsAsia report said that prosecutors are demanding that Yee be send to a Reformatory Training Centre after the controversial video reappeared on his YouTube page. The video, which was taken down in March, has been viewed over a million times, and shared more than 9,500 times.

    Vulcan Post
  • Alba’s billion dollar company

    Jessica Alba’s business The Honest Company has been valuated at $1 billion. The 34-year-old actress-and-entrepreneur and her partner Chris Gavigan founded the venture in 2012 with the intention of providing toxin-free household goods and baby products. Jessica is the cover girl on the latest issue of Forbes magazine and her face is accompanied by a headline which dubs her as ‘America’s Richest Self-Made Woman’.

    Cover Media
  • Merkel: Germany will be 'constructive partner' in EU reform

    The comments made alongside David Cameron came as the British prime minister wrapped up a whirlwind tour of four European capitals to press his case for concessions on the terms of Britain's membership in the EU. Cameron's newly-elected Conservative government has promised to hold a referendum by the end of 2017 on whether Britain should remain within the EU. Ahead of that vote, he's looking to get concessions on the terms of Britain's membership.

    Associated Press
  • 8 Reasons Why You Need To Download Google Inbox Now

    Google Inbox is the productivity app we’ve all been waiting for. It was first introduced in October last year to a select few, and has now been made available to everyone. You might wonder what’s so special about Google Inbox — there are tons of productivity apps out there, after all. After checking it out, what we can safely say is this: Google Inbox has made important To-Dos way easier to resolve, and it’s only getting better with some new tricks up its sleeve.

    Vulcan Post
  • Blatter set to win new term despite soccer corruption scandal

    By Mike Collett and Brian Homewood ZURICH (Reuters) - World soccer boss Sepp Blatter was expected to be re-elected on Friday, defying growing calls for him to step down in the face of corruption scandals engulfing the sport's governing body. Addressing delegates at FIFA's annual Congress in Switzerland, where members will later vote to decide the organization's presidency, Blatter promised more transparency and urged members to remain unified. Europe, which accounts for all but three of the countries that have ever made it to a World Cup's final match, is particularly keen to banish the 79-year-old Swiss.

    Reuters 46 mins ago
  • U.S. swimming pools ban long breath-holding after deaths

    By Barbara Goldberg NEW YORK (Reuters) - A U.S. Navy SEAL hopeful and his friend, an off-duty lifeguard, were barreling through underwater drills in a pool just 3.5 feet (1 meter) deep. This summer, nearly four years after those deaths in a Staten Island pool raised alarms about a little known hazard called shallow-water blackout or hypoxic blackout, New York City is putting up warning signs at all public pools prohibiting prolonged breath holding. It is part of a movement to raise awareness of the peril that has killed accomplished swimmers and to stop it by banning lengthy breath holding in the nation's estimated 300,000 public pools.

    Reuters
  • Bobbi Kristina ‘will never come off life support’

    Bobbi Kristina will “never” be removed from life support by her family, according to reports. The 22-year-old daughter of late singer Whitney Houston was placed in a medically induced coma after being found unresponsive in the bathtub of her Roswell, Georgia home on January 31.

    Cover Media
  • Myanmar restricts journalists after photos show sleeping MPs

    Journalists were negotiating with Myanmar officials Thursday to restore their access to the Parliament chamber after being pushed out because pictures of snoozing lawmakers were published online. The pictures of sleeping MPs was the main reason cited by Kyaw Soe, director general of the Union Parliament, which handles administrative duties. In a minor victory, the journalists were told they could occupy the upper floor of the chamber, but they were continuing to negotiate Thursday evening.

    Associated Press
  • China stocks extend fall, investors jittery after big tumble

    HONG KONG (AP) -- Chinese stocks fell again Friday as investors remained jittery a day after a sharp sell-off. Other major Asian benchmarks climbed. KEEPING SCORE: The Shanghai Composite Index in mainland China declined

    Associated Press
  • Far from the madding crowd: China's rich seek own islands

    As sunset falls on his private island in the South China Sea, entrepreneur Lin Dong likes few things better than to lounge on a hammock strung between two trees as waves lap the shore. There are at least 600 island owners in China, he estimates, mostly corporations planning tourism or fishing development, but also individuals who build private clubhouses to entertain friends and officials. Lawyer Wang Yue, 41, commutes from China's commercial hub Shanghai to a one square kilometre uninhabited island about 40 kilometres from the coast.

    AFP News
  • Insight: All at sea: Australia's search for MH370 under scrutiny

    By Swati Pandey and Jane Wardell SYDNEY (Reuters) - Nearly a year after embarking on a multi-million dollar quest to solve one of aviation's greatest unsolved mysteries, authorities and search teams are being criticised over their approach to finding Flight MH370 in the remote southern Indian Ocean. The Australian-led search, already the most expensive in aviation history, has found no trace of the Malaysia Airlines jet or its 239 passengers and crew, prompting calls for a rethink into the way the mission is conducted. Heightening concerns, Australian authorities said on Wednesday that another search vessel, the Go Phoenix, which is using the world's best deep sea search equipment and crew provided by U.S. firm Phoenix International Holdings Inc, would pull out within weeks.

    Reuters
  • US spelling bee ends in a tie -- again

    The world's premier spelling bee ended in a tie in the US for a second year in a row after an intense 10-round showdown between two young contestants who tackled some of the English language's most obscure words. Vanya Shivashankar, 13, and Gokul Venkatachalam, 14, together hoisted the gold trophy amid a flurry of confetti after they clinched the 88th Scripps National Spelling Bee. Venkatachalam, a basketball fanatic sporting sharp Air Jordans, also tackled such tongue-twisters as poblacion, caudillismo and nixtamal with panache.

    AFP News
  • S. Korea confirms 10 MERS cases

    South Korea confirmed three more MERS cases Friday, bringing the total number of patients infected with the potentially deadly virus to 10, including a man who defied a quarantine protocol and travelled to China, health officials said. The infections were all traced to the original case of a 68-year-old man diagnosed on May 20 after returning from a trip to Saudi Arabia. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is considered a deadlier but less infectious cousin of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus that appeared in Asia in 2003 and killed hundreds of people, mostly in China.

    AFP News
  • Wenger, Arsenal eye FA Cup history

    Arsene Wenger would love to silence his critics by making history when holders Arsenal take on Aston Villa in the FA Cup final on Saturday. Frustrated by Arsenal's failure to win the Premier League since 2004 and their inability to make an impact in the Champions League, even some Gunners fans have turned on Wenger over the last two years. Verbally abused at a railway station following defeat at Stoke and forced to endure the indignity of supporters holding banners calling for his sacking, the Arsenal manager has maintained a dignified stance in the face of extreme provocation this term.

    AFP News
  • Portman reflects on Harvard education

    Natalie Portman was keen to prove she was more than “just a dumb actress” when she arrived at Harvard University. The 33-year-old actress attended Harvard from 1999 to 2003, and left with a degree in psychology. "When I came in as a freshman in 1999, I felt like there had been some mistake and that I wasn't smart enough to be in this company," Natalie said.

    Cover Media
  • Ex-Thai PM and key Shinawatra ally in court over 2008 crackdown

    A former Thai prime minister and key member of the embattled Shinawatra family pleaded not guilty Friday to criminal charges of abuse of power over a crackdown on a 2008 protest, the latest court case to ensnare the divisive clan. Somchai Wongsawat -- brother-in-law of deposed premiers Thaksin and Yingluck Shinawatra -- was prime minister for 80 days but was turfed from office by a court after massive anti-government protests by the People's Alliance for Democracy (PAD) commonly known as the 'Yellow Shirts.' Somchai has been tipped for a possible comeback as leader of the battered Shinawatra-aligned Puea Thai party, which was swept aside by a military coup last May shortly after Yingluck was toppled by another court decision and banned from politics. Two people died and scores were injured in October 2008 when police used tear gas to clear the anti-Shinawatra, royalist 'Yellow Shirt' protesters who had blockaded Government House to prevent Somchai entering.

    AFP News
  • Taylor Swift: I’m OK with not being sexy

    Taylor Swift knows she’s not an “overtly sexy” person. “That's a way of people saying I’m just not generally a sexy person,” she told Access Hollywood. Taylor has made a hugely successful career for herself through writing about processes she is going through.

    Cover Media
  • India battles deadliest heatwave in two decades

    Indian authorities urged hospitals to treat heatstroke as an emergency as the toll from a long heatwave topped 1,800 on Friday, making it the deadliest in more than two decades. Hundreds of mainly poor people die at the height of summer every year in India, but this year's figures are already nearly double the annual average. Experts say the official figures likely understate the true impact because heatstroke disproportionately affects the poor and homeless, who are less likely to die in hospitals.

    AFP News