• Philippines turns to heavy firepower as hunt for rebel leader narrows

    By Tom Allard MARAWI CITY, Philippines (Reuters) - Philippine armed forces helicopters fired guided rockets at Islamist militant positions on Saturday in an attempt to end a siege in the southern city of Marawi that has raged for five days. The use for the first time of the heavy firepower came amid growing confidence that the location of the man believed to be the leader of the Islamic State-inspired fighters, Isnilon Hapilon, has been pinpointed in the city. "We are trying to use our maximum force," said Major General Carlito Galvez, who heads the military command in the Western Mindanao region.

  • MMA mom slaps her son in the cage after humiliating loss

    MMA fighter Viktor Kichigin was on the end of a brutal defeat on Thursday and suffered further humiliation after his mother entered the cage.

  • China condemns US after warship sails near South China Sea reef

    China on Thursday accused the United States of trespassing after a US warship sailed near a reef claimed by Beijing in the South China Sea, the first such operation by President Donald Trump's administration in the disputed waterway. The row comes during a period of warming relations between the countries, with Trump saying that Washington has dialed down pressure on Beijing over other issues in hopes of securing their cooperation on North Korea. The guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey entered the area "without permission from the Chinese government", Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang told reporters at a regular press briefing, adding that the ship had "trespassed in the waters near the relevant islands and reefs." "The relevant action taken by the US vessel undermines China's sovereignty and security interests, and is very likely to cause unexpected sea and air accidents," he said, urging Washington to stop "provocative actions." The USS Dewey sailed less than 12 nautical miles from Mischief Reef -- part of the Spratly Islands -- on Thursday morning local time, a US official said earlier, the first freedom of navigation operation under Trump.

  • Former security chief of Chinese city sentenced over corruption - state media

    The former public security boss of China's northern city of Tianjin was given a suspended death sentence on corruption charges, state media reported on Saturday. Wu Changshun was convicted of bribery, embezzlement and abuse of power, the official People's Daily newspaper said on its WeChat public account. The death sentence was suspended for two years and is likely to result in life in prison.

  • Apple opens first official store in Southeast Asia

    Apple opened its first Southeast Asia store in Singapore on Saturday, drawing hundreds of excited fans to the swanky two-storey site in the city's upmarket shopping district. Located on the affluent Orchard Road, the new shop -- easily distinguished by its iconic glass facade -- is expected to be one of the most popular Apple stores in the world according to the US tech giant. First in the queue was Xiang Jiaxin, a twenty-five-year-old Chinese national working in Macau who had queued for more than 12 hours overnight and planned a holiday to Singapore specially to coincide with the opening.

  • Anonymous Muslim opens arms to grieving Mancunians

    "I'm Muslim and I trust you. Do you trust me enough for a hug?" asks a blindfolded man, arms out wide, to mourners at the focal point of tributes to victims of the Manchester bombing.

  • Off-lease used cars are flooding market, pushing prices down

    In 2014, Infiniti leased more than 28,000 Q50 luxury sedans for as little as $329 per month in a growing U.S. market. The leases accounted for more than three-quarters of Q50 sales. Now they're coming ...