• Malaysia's Anwar in hospital with "serious" health problems: wife

    Malaysia's jailed ex-opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim was hospitalised Tuesday for a host of health problems including "erratic" blood pressure, his wife said. Wan Azizah Wan Ismail also criticised the prison authorities for allegedly delaying Anwar's request for treatment and tests for his medical problems. "His blood pressure goes up and down and is erratic.

    AFP News
  • Philippines' highest-ranking communist rebel held: military

    The top communist guerrilla leader in the Philippines has been arrested in a blow to the decades-old Maoist rebellion following the detention of his predecessors last year, officials said Tuesday. Adelberto Silva is considered the "highest ranking" leader of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) and its New People's Army (NPA) armed wing, a military statement said. "He is the overall orchestrator of rebel movements in the entire country.

    AFP News
  • Kim K: We're so excited!

    Kim Kardashian and Kanye West are "beyond excited" to be expecting another baby.The couple have made no secret of their desire to have a brother or sister for their 23-month-old daughter North, and on last night's episode of Keeping Up with the Kardashians

    Cover Media
  • Bruce Jenner's public transition to Caitlyn comes at pivotal time for transgender community

    Former Olympic athlete and reality TV star Bruce Jenner, who is transitioning to life as a woman, revealed her new name as Caitlyn Jenner on Monday (1 June) and posed in a white strapless corset on the cover of Vanity Fair magazine. Jenner's public transition has social media abuzz and her coming out story now joins what the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community are calling a formative time in the way that transgender people are written about and depicted in the media. What we saw with the Diane Sawyer interview and what's followed since is a really respectful way of reporting trans people's transition stories or identities.

    IB Times
  • Malaysian brothers get settlement in Flight 370 lawsuit

    Two Malaysian boys whose father was a passenger on the jetliner that vanished in March last year secured an out-of-court settlement in the tragedy's first legal case against Malaysia Airlines and the government. Lawyer Arunan Selvaraj said Tuesday the mother of the boys decided to accept compensation on their behalf so that they can "move forward with their life." Arunan declined to reveal the amount. Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board when it disappeared March 8 last year.

    Associated Press
  • Russians weigh Gorbachev reforms that sank USSR 30 years on

    A few months after the politburo chose him as Soviet supremo in early 1985, Mikhail Gorbachev halted his cortege in downtown Leningrad for an impromptu walkabout that signalled change was in the air. Emerging from his government limousine, the then 54-year-old Communist party boss from southern Russia strode over to talk to a crowd of shocked passers-by -- shattering protocol that kept Kremlin bigwigs away from average people. "Comrades, it seems that we really do need reforms," Gorbachev told the crowd that day.

    AFP News
  • Skarsgård and Chung ‘getting serious’

    Alexander Skarsgård and Alexa Chung’s relationship has “really heated up”, according to reports. “It is serious and has really heated up," a source told Us Weekly, while another added: "It's a fun relationship for both of them. The Big Apple seems to be the pair’s city of choice, as rumours began to circulate in February after the True Blood star was spotted out and about with Alexa on two consecutive days.

    Cover Media
  • Wanted Thai general turns himself in on human trafficking charges

    A three-star Thai general accused of involvement in human trafficking turned himself in to authorities on Tuesday, the most high profile among scores of suspects wanted as part of a police crackdown on the illicit trade. A total of 84 arrest warrants has been issued over human trafficking, a business that activists and the United States say Thailand has done little to stop. Lieutenant General Manus Kongpan said he was ready and willing to go to trial.

    Reuters
  • US justices rule for Muslim denied job over headscarf

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday for a Muslim woman who did not get hired after she showed up to a job interview with clothing retailer Abercrombie & Fitch wearing a black headscarf. The justices said that employers generally have to accommodate job applicants and employees with religious needs if the employer at least has an idea that such accommodation is necessary. Job applicant Samantha Elauf did not tell her interviewer she was Muslim.

    Associated Press
  • Philippine leader visits Japan amid China land claim tensions

    Philippine President Benigno Aquino on Tuesday began a four-day visit to Japan that will see him court investment and seek support for his opposition to China's land reclamation in the South China Sea. The Filipino leader's visit to Tokyo comes less than a month after the two countries held their first joint military drill in modern history -- despite Japan's role as occupier of much of Asia during World War II. Aquino's schedule also includes a meeting with Japan's emperor Wednesday and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday, after speaking at an investment forum designed to lure potential business deals. Beijing has ramped up its land reclamation in the South China Sea at a dramatic pace in recent months, constructing man-made islands on top of reefs across a wide area to back up its territorial claims.

    AFP News
  • The Rock’s ‘San Andreas’ Aftershocks Extend to Overseas Box Office

    The Rock, as “San Andreas” star Dwayne Johnson was once known, may have to change his nickname to The Boulder if his new earthquake movie stays on its current roll at the worldwide box office. Monday’s final figures show “San Andreas” brought in $64 million from roughly 60 foreign markets over the weekend, about $4 million higher than Warner Bros. had estimated Sunday. The domestic haul for the New Line action film co-financed by Village Roadshow was bigger than estimated as well, at $54.5 million, so it finished with nearly $120 million in its first weekend — or more than its $110 million production budget.

    The Wrap
  • Man at work: Aussie guard Dellavedova sparks Cavs with grit

    Growing up in Maryborough, Australia, Matthew Dellavedova tried every sport. No matter if it was playing basketball, soccer, Australian Rules football, tennis, cricket or field hockey, the now Cleveland Cavaliers backup point guard went after the ball with disregard for his body. "He's always been that way," said his 77-year-old grandfather, Alan Dellavedova, who watches all of Cleveland's games in Australia.

    Associated Press
  • More older Americans are being buried by housing debt

    Al and Saundra Karp have found an unconventional way to raise money and help save their Miami-area home from foreclosure: They're lining up gigs for their family jazz band. Of all the financial threats facing Americans of retirement age — outliving savings, falling for scams, paying for long-term care — housing isn't supposed to be one. Retirees who use retirement money to pay housing costs can face disaster if their health deteriorates or their savings run short.

    Associated Press
  • What Happens When a Harvard Engineer Gets Robbed?

    He designs a smarter home security system—without contracts, installation fees or sneaky salesmen. Discover a smarter way to protect your home today.

  • Ghana surprise Argentina at U-20 World Cup

    Ghana stunned favourites Argentina 3-2 at the FIFA Under-20 World Cup on Tuesday, with Ukraine demolishing Myanmar 6-0 and USA advancing to leave hosts New Zealand facing an early exit. Six-time champions Argentina, already reeling after a 2-2 draw with unfancied Panama, were 3-0 down and looked completely outclassed before a late fightback.

    AFP News
  • 'Baby warehouses' put African infants at risk in Israel

    It is nap-time at Felizia's daycare centre, a squalid street-level flat in Tel Aviv where loud pop music drowns out the miserable cries of dozens of children and babies cooped up inside. Run by a corpulent Ghanian woman, it is one of dozens of unlicensed establishments which have sprouted up across Israel's commercial capital offering an "affordable" child-minding service to thousands of illegal African immigrants who have to go to work. The authorities do not close them down because they are the only affordable option for many immigrants who have to work, said Maya Peleg, director of Unitaf.

    AFP News 55 mins ago
  • South Africa park where lion killed American stays open

    The park was open to tourists and had received no queries about the attack that took place a day earlier, said Scott Simpson, assistant operations manager at the Lion Park. An American woman was killed by a lioness on Monday when the animal attacked her through an open car window, also injuring the driver of the car who remains hospitalized. The attacking lioness will not be euthanized, but will be moved to another property owned by the park away from tourists, said Simpson.

    Associated Press 37 mins ago
  • KFC sues Chinese companies for online rumors about its food

    Restaurant operator KFC said Monday it filed a lawsuit against three companies in China whose social media accounts spread false claims about its food, including that its chickens have eight legs. The case filed by China's biggest restaurant operator comes as the government intensifies a campaign to clean up rumors on social media. In an announcement posted on its Chinese website, KFC said one of the best-known fake rumors was that chickens used by the company are genetically modified and have six wings and eight legs.

    Associated Press
  • Young nurses swap studies for Ukraine frontline

    Dressed in camouflage shorts and with her short hair dyed bright red, Nika looks more like a rock fan than a nurse at a makeshift Ukrainian hospital. At the half-destroyed house serving as a "hospital" in Pisky, on the front line of heavy fighting between government forces and pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine, one soldier shows her a bloodied hand. Nika, a student in Drogobych, a small town in the traditionally more nationalist west of Ukraine, decided to take a year off her studies and arrived in Pisky in March.

    AFP News
  • California school district sued over graduation dress code

    A Native American student sued his California school district on Monday over its refusal to let him wear an eagle feather during his high school graduation ceremony, claiming his rights to freedom of expression and religion in the state constitution are being violated. Christian Titman, 18, a member of the Pit River Tribe, said he wants to attach the 5-inch feather he received from his father to the tassel on his cap at the Clovis High School ceremony set for Thursday. The tribe considers eagle feathers sacred and symbolic of a significant accomplishment.

    Associated Press
  • Breaking hearts, breaking chains: Paris removes 'love locks'

    Paris, known worldwide as the city of romance, began the heart-breaking process Monday of removing hundreds of thousands of "love-locks", padlocks chained to the city's bridges by adoring couples. Yellow-vested officials were out early Monday morning on the city's iconic Pont des Arts, wielding cutting equipment to free the padlocks while a handful of curious tourists looked on. Loved-up visitors from around the world have for years written their names on padlocks to symbolise their passion, then tossed the key into the River Seine so that nothing could ever break the bond.

    AFP News